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with this sequester, it was a total disaster for them. then they decide not to fight on the debt ceiling and they need to move the attention on to something else. say they do have leverage elsewhere. so they have chosen sequester and put up a very brave face on it. it's possible they could convince themselves to let it actually happen but the idea that they get some sort of significant political gain from it, these are cuts they hated and they hated in large part because they hurt things they care about. so to permit the sequester to go forward on that kind of rationale is not a political win, not a policy win. everybody is losing. >> the "new york times" op-ed says more than a million jobs are on the line if this deal isn't made. a quote saying the losses will soon spread as contracts to states and cities are cut, education and police grants are cut, and payments to medicare providers are cut, even the aid just approved to victims of hurricane sandy will fall under the sequester's act. americans are about to find out what happens when an entire political party demands deficit reduction at all costs b
with this recent debt ceiling vote. i think, basically, business is going to have to come forward like with regard to the debt ceiling and say look, you can't do this. you are going to wreck the economy of the united states and wreck the economy of the world. i'm hoping that we won't get there. but, alex, i have to tell you, it would not shock me if we do. >> okay. let's switch gears. on the heels of the senate confirmation hearing for chuck hagel, has the political climate changed with the new members of congress on board? >> well, you know, with regard -- first of all, with regard to chuck hagel, the media basically reported that he got beaten up pretty bad. i didn't see it that way. i thought he held his own. i anticipate that we will have a lot of motion, commotion and emotion but chuck hagel will be confirmed. he'll do a great job. after all, the president should have the persons he wants to carry out his policy. i think that will be the case. with regard to the new congress, we have to have a wait and see situation. the number of tea partiers lost their seats. they're still a strong force in
the debt ceiling in 2011. >> but they now say it was the president who is responsible. >> exactly. they voted for this. >> and paul ryan runs a marathon in less than one hour. >> i thought it was like 20 minutes. he's superman. this is what they wanted. >> of course. congressman, here is another apparent contradiction you might like to clear up for us. on the one hand, you have eric cantor out there giving a speech on making life work. he sounds like tony robbins or something. he's trying to sell yet another iteration of the republican party, but when you strip away the soft smile and the cadence, he'd happily slash every one of those programs that you just went through, wouldn't he? >> oh, absolutely. eric cantor despite all of the covering in the near is definitely proposing budgets that are hostile to middle and low income people. and particularly to vulnerable people, but not only that, you know, programs like s.n.a.p. actually give people money they can spend at the store that allows the store to hire people. eventually the programs they cut will hurt the people who are emplo
, the debt ceiling. now the sequester. i mean, we're now talk about perhaps $85 billion in spending cuts in 2013 if they don't get their act together on the sequester. that's pointing exactly in the opposite direction. so the fed is kind of setting the table but not getting the support from the congress on the fiscal side. >> so given the looming debt ceiling limit here, this week on morning joe the "new york times" economist argued why the u.s. should spend now and worry about deficit reduction later. here it is. >> dashing spending when you still have depressed economy is really destructive. it's probably even counterproductive even in purely fiscal terms. we should be sustaining government spending until we have a stronger economic recovery. >> this is not a hard call. as long as we have 4 million people who have been unemployed for more than a year, this is not a time to be worrying about reducing the budget deficit. give me something that looks more like a normal employment situation and i'll become a deficit hawk but not now. >> do you subscribe to that, jared? or is that too extre
overseas. your push right now is getting it back home. >> with the fiscal cliff and debt ceiling and trying to get bipartisan, but over here is something called poverty, 50 million americans and racial disparity and cities collapsing and the like. i'm going to make the case we should build america an urban infrastructural bank for the purpose of long-term loans. we do it in europe and japan. and no other country charges people to repatriate their money once they pay taxes in that country. but we do. but if we, in fact, took a portion of that money, part for research and development and part of it for an institutional bank, you could do what banks are not doing, and that's invest in these downtrodden areas of our country. >> gillian, we've been talking about it for years, trillions of dollars sitting on the sidelines not coming back to america. how do we get it back here? >> almost $2 trillion. you've got average household earnings down over the past four years, poverty is up. we need this money working in our economy. how do we get it here? >> absolutely. i think the reverend's idea is very
consensus to keep kicking the can down the road. i think the debt ceiling went like groundhog day. it's like this time we're going to have this debate. then at midnight on new year's eve we pass a bill and give senators six minutes to reid it before it goes and we've now avoided the fiscal by kicking the can down the road which now we passed a bill to push off until may the reckoning for the debt ceiling. nobody has come to the table to try to fix things. i say the senate hasn't actually passed a budget. the president and democrats haven't passed a budget in four years. there is a fundamental inability for congress to do their job. you are supposed to pass a budget by april 15. you are supposed to reconcile all those bills by october. that hasn't happened in four years. instead we've had this crisis atmosphere where things are passed in the middle of the night and nothing gets done. >> we only look at law makers records as they pertain to gun related issues. the numbers in the house and numbers of the senate haven't changed so much from the previous congress but there are faces that haven't
by raising the debt ceiling and that is no way to govern the country. i am hopeful that new labels will give us a way to govern the country where we start out at least bleeding in trusting the other members across the aisle have come to congress for the same reason we have. >> what can you do to bring about a more thoughtful, pragmatic congress? i want to throw out three ideas that are beyond the scope of what knolls febles has taken on. -- no labels has taken on. it was not perfect. we have 150 saved seats. they fear their primary. number two, money. and sentence. the creation of money is one of the threats to democracy. where incentivize to do crazy things. i give two examples last night. when the season the outrageous on the floor, when a republican member calls the president a liar, when a democratic member says the republican health care program is don't get sick and if you die, die quickly. those statements damage the fabric of our democracy and they raised $1 million in 24 hours. we can do about -- something about those first two. number three is the media. i am old enough to remember
in august of 2011, we ended up passing the budget control act tied with the debt ceiling issue. and out of that, the administration -- through that, the administration proposed, president obama proposed a measure which was designed to force the congress to deal -- to step up to the plate and deal with the real problem. the real problem is a continued deficit spending at a level which we cannot begin to contemplate. which has to be addressed because it's accumulated year after year after year. we are now at the point where the clock is ticking at $16.5 trillion of debt that we have gotten into, up nearly $5 trillion in just the last four years. and the math clearly proves and history clearly shows that this is unsustainable, and this is the great challenge before this congress, to do what is necessary to get us on the right path to fiscal health before it all comes down. we had a warning shot fired across our bow in 2009 as to the disattorney generals in our economy and the consequences were grave -- distortions in our economy and the consequences were grave. we had warning shots fired a
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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